Grand Canyon University Justification of Quarantine Policy Discussion

Walden University Wk 4 Skills Versus Traits & Systems Perspective Discussion

Walden University Wk 4 Skills Versus Traits & Systems Perspective Discussion
kills Versus Traits and the Systems PerspectiveSkills Approach differs from Trait Theory because it focuses on an individual’s skills and abilities versus an individual’s traits. Although traits may be important for a leader in public health, skills also determine leadership effectiveness. Contemporary research has noted that an individual may garner skills and competencies from professional experiences. For example, a leader’s skills derived from non-profit experience securing funds for multiple, low-funded health clinics may assist in developing valuable competencies in matters of negotiation and organization. From developed skills and competencies, an individual may gain a leadership position or emerge as an effective leader.For this Discussion, review the Learning Resources, with specific attention to the journal article by Mumford, Zaccaro, Harding, Jacobs, and Fleishman. Reflect on skills and traits that might be necessary for leadership within a public health setting. Also, think about how traits and skills may relate to your personal public health leadership philosophy.

Walden University Wk 4 Skills and Trait Theory Replies Responses

Walden University Wk 4 Skills and Trait Theory Replies Responses
1 hour agoNicholas O’Clair RE: Discussion – Week 4COLLAPSEThe basis of trait theory focuses on the innate qualities and characteristics often possessed by recognized community leaders (Allen, 2018). It is understood that these qualities built into individual personality and is what contributes to personal success in guiding groups towards a common goal (Allen, 2018). The skills theory is centered on the knowledge and abilities possessed by the individual that are developed with experience which contribute to effective leadership practices (Allen, 2018). The skills approach is based off the idea that learned abilities are what create an effective leader and not underlying qualities an individual has (Allen, 2018).Similarities of the skills and trait theoriesBoth the skills and trait models are leader-centric and focused on what characteristics about leaders make them effective. Both approaches agree that for leaders to succeed they must possess knowledge based in their field of expertise and have the ability to grow and mold with environmental needs (Harrison, 2017). Understanding processes and having the capability to relate different parts of a system on a macro level is a task both models agree is a must have characteristic for leaders (Nahavandi, 2014). Additionally, problem-solving and critical thinking are two qualities skills and trait theories identify as required to be a successful leader (Nahavandi, 2014). While skills and trait models do not align on all attributes, these specific topics are shared and labeled as essential in both approaches.In addition to the above characteristics, both the skills and trait theory overlap on the topic of creativity. Whether this quality is developed or innate, the ability to formulate new and unique ideas to foster team or organizational growth is imperative to a leadership role (Tang, 2019; Pidgeon, 2017). Typically, a person with an openminded attitude and a solid foundation in the functional aspects of the organization are those that are most successful in leading which is why both the models agree that critical thinking is a key talent to have. Formulating new and inventive practices holds significant value in leadership roles making it an important faucet is recognized in both models.Differences between the skills and trait theoriesThrough the theoretical framework of both approaches, the basis for trait and skills theories have fundamental differences in underlying features that contribute to the characteristics that create a leader. The skills approach follows the understanding that competency in technical, human, and conceptual skills are what leads to an effective leader (Nahavandi, 2014). The skills in this concept are not given, but rather harnessed with training and application. Trait theory focuses on the basis of ten characteristics that are present in one’s personality and do not need development in order to harness (Nahavandi, 2014). Instead, these qualities are innate and apart of all leader personalities. Recognizing the source of characteristics, it is clear that skills and trait theory vary on the basis of how leaders are created .Due to the underlying factors that relate to leadership qualities, the skills model is very weak in its predictability. The skills theory also lacks specificity on how variations in social judgment skills and problem-solving skills affect performance (Nahavandi, 2014). The model can be faulted because it does not explain how skills lead to effective leadership performance. On the other hand, trait theory has an expansive history and research that explains the correlation between the identified characteristics and their relation to leadership abilities (Hogan, & Foster, 2017). This also provides a sense of reliability and predictability in trait theory that is not present in skills theory.Can a skill be a trait and vice versa?While skills and traits can be mistakenly used as synonyms, both of these terms have very different meanings. With traits being given qualities and skills being learn talents, the argument can be made that skills can be traits, but traits cannot be skills. One can develop skills from specific traits through education and experience, however if traits are given at birth the learning process does not have a direct impact on their creation but rather can harness one’s traits to accomplish goals. For example, honesty is a defined trait following the model. Technical, interpersonal, and conceptual skill development cannot directly influence one’s honesty. However, the development of interpersonal skills can aid in harnessing one’s honesty as a key leadership trait.How the skills and trait theories relate to my personal public health leadership philosophyWhile both skills and traits are important in providing individual characteristics that contribute to success, a hybrid of both models can provide an even stronger understanding of the relationship between traits and skills and their impacts on leadership. Individuals must have a combination of innate qualities and learned attributes in order to be successful in both troubleshooting issues and further developing organizations into more productive and mission driven teams. Traits like confidence and intelligence are useful, but the incorporation of technical, interpersonal, and conceptual skills through education whether self or taught will allow such traits to be further applied. Together, skills and traits working in concert will truly allow individuals to stand out as leaders in the public health sector.References:Allen, W. E. (2018). Leadership Theory: A Different Conceptual Approach. Journal of Leadership Education, 17(2).Harrison, C. (2017). Leadership theory and research: A critical approach to new and existing paradigms. Springer.Hogan, R., & Foster, J. (2017). Two further problems with Trait Theory. International Journal of Personality Psychology, 3(1), 23-25.Nahavandi, A. (2014). The art and science of leadership (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Pidgeon, K. (2017). The keys for success: Leadership core competencies. Journal of Trauma Nursing| JTN, 24(6), 338-341.Tang, K. N. (2019). Leadership styles and organizational effectiveness. In Leadership and change management (pp. 11-25). Springer, Singapore.Brittney JonesDiscussion 4- Skills Approach IntroductionThe skills theory to leadership emphasizes the teachable abilities of a person to lead. On the other hand, the trait approach theory posits that a person is naturally born with qualities that make them a leader. In this discussion, the similarities and differences between both traits will be presented, and a practical application to my leadership philosophy will be made.Similarities of Skills and Trait TheoriesThe first similarity between the skills and trait theories is that both approaches emphasize the need for a leader to have the adequate mental capacity to lead. Intelligence and technical knowledge are essential for leaders to understand the processes and techniques needed to effectively perform a role (Nahavandi, 2014), and the integration of that role into a larger system.The second similarity is that under both theories, leaders need the emotional capacity to foster positive human interactions. Whether a leader possesses the skills of effective communication or an extraverted and agreeable personality, both serve them well in developing good working relationships with team numbers which are necessary for sharing vision, resolving issues, and strengthening cohesion.The third similarity is that leaders need to have the ability to develop and implement unique ideas that are essential for effective policies within an organization (Penn State, 2017). Leaders should be able to think critically and creatively to solve problems and make decisions. They may naturally have a personality that makes them open to experiences, imaginative and adventurous in their strategies of working. The leader may also learn how to apply new ideas and concepts in their work. Differences Between the Skills and Traits TheoriesThe first difference is that traits theory emphasizes the individual characteristics of a leader such as motivation, honesty, and self-confidence (Nahavandi, 2014). Such qualities are mostly innate in the nature and personality of a person. On the other hand, skills such as knowing how to operate tools or for a job or building connectedness among team members can be taught to a leader and developed overtime.The second difference is that under the trait theory there are we find numerous personality types such as proactive, type A, narcissistic, psychopathic, and others (Nahavandi, 2014). The skill theory on the other hand summarizes leadership skills into three primary categories technical, interpersonal, and conceptual.The final difference is that a skill can be objectively observed and evaluated whereas measuring personalities is less rigid and objective. Measuring the degree of a leader’s curiosity, assertiveness, or flexibility, for example, may call for self-reporting which can introduce bias based on a person’s self-perception. Can a Skill be a Trait and Vice Versa?In my in my opinion a skill cannot be a treat because skills are qualities that are teachable and can be improved over time. Personality traits are not easily taught and do not easily change over time because of their innate nature. On the other hand, I believe traits can develop into a skill if it is appropriately developed and expressed. One example is that a leader with a charismatic and self-confident personality can translate these qualities into the skills of motivating team members and raising the morale of the team to achieve an outcome. Similarly, extroverted personality types can easily be developed into networking skills through training on appropriate approaches. How the Skills and Trait Theories Relate to my Personal Public Health Leadership Philosophy My personal philosophy is that leadership is a combination of learned skills and innate traits that are practiced and expressed in ideal contexts. The skills that I believe I can develop to become a stronger leader are my ability to negotiate and resolve conflict. There are some passive treats in my personality whereby I sometimes find it challenging to persuade or motivate personality types that are overbearing or narcissistic. I can learn how to work with people who are unwilling to change and how to negotiate for a mutually satisfactory outcome. Even though the traits theory posits that my technical knowledge, interpersonal skill, and conceptual abilities make me an effective leader, I believe that under the treat theory it is essential that I also assess the parts of my personality that compliments these skills and strengthen the parts that threaten my effectiveness. Concluding ThoughtsPublic health leaders must perform at a specific competency level that incorporates their education, practice, and regulation (Genat & Robinson, 2010). This comprehensive approach calls for leaders to not only be knowledgeable and intelligent, and effective in their practice and interactions with others, but also bring accountability and measurability of their leadership. Furthermore, the ability to predict challenges and promptly act on suspicions of threats to public health (Topol, 2004) is critical to effective leadership. One of the challenging skills a leader must develop is the ability to make good judgement, considering the weighty consequences that a misstep or poor decision can have. Ineffectiveness in this skill can lead to ethical issues if the health of a population is jeopardized.ReferencesGenat B, Robinson P. (2010). New competencies for public health graduates: a useful tool for course design. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34(5):513-516. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00599.xNahavandi, A. (2014). The art and science of leadership (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.Penn State. (2017). A practical application of the trait approach vs skills approach to leadership. https://sites.psu.edu/leaderfoundationsdobbs/2017/02/12/a-practical-application-of-the-trait-approach-vs-skills-approach-to-leadership/#:~:text=While%20the%20trait%20approach%20focuses,(Northouse%2C%202016%2C%20p.&text=Technical%20skill%20is%20knowledge%20about,type%20of%20work%20or%20activity.Topol, E. J. (2004). Failing the public health – rofecoxib, merck, and the FDA. The New England Journal of Medicine, 351(17), 1707-9. https://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fscholarly-journals%2Ffailing-public-health-rofecoxib-merck-fda%2Fdocview%2F223937474%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D14872

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